Top 8 J2ME MIDP Applications

Well, in line with the Do Not Drive from the local police (and one from Gloucestershire), I’ll be phoning in to ThePhoneCoop AGM today and doing a bit of work from home.

While preparing for the journey that never was, I realised that I’ve mentioned some of these phone tools in articles like Connecting from the k608i with SSL, but not all of them. So, here’s my favourite Java phone applications:-

  1. MidpSSH: this is my main workhorse, as long as I have a stable data connection (even 3G seems to freak sometimes above 120mph). I’ll be connected to a screen session in our server (TERM=linux) using lynx, irssi, mailx and other tools I learnt back at UEA;
  2. MujMail: if I don’t have a stable network connection, this seems a good way to download email from SSL in bursts for offline reading;
  3. Mobile RSS Reader: downloads RSS in bursts for offline reading;
  4. anyRemote: this is my main workhourse at home, replacing the above three applications. My phone doesn’t do WiFi, so I use bluetooth to run shell commands on my workstation, read RSS feeds and email and view web pages. Combined with a video-sender, it also acts as a remote control when playing internet video feeds on the TV. At a push, it can control the workstation’s full GUI, but that’s a bit slow and awkward;
  5. JabberMixClient: I’m having a few problems controlling this in version 2, but 1.x uses the basic GUI and works mostly fine. I guess I ought to fix its bugs, but I’m terrible at Java;
  6. MicroCalc2: a cool lisp-driven spreadsheet, handy for sums you want to keep and it went GPL about two years ago;
  7. ReadManiac: much better than the built-in browser for text files and went GPL about a year ago. If only I could work out how to sign it with my local TTLLP certificate authority and get rid of the security prompts;
  8. MFRadio: useful when the built-in FM RDS radio can’t find anything interesting. The interface is a bit clunky and it really racks up data transfer charges, but it seems worth keeping around.

All of those are free and open source software, mostly under the GNU GPL. The only thing I feel I’m really missing now is a free and open source FTP client, for uploading photos to my preferred photo-sharing site. Any suggestions?

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